Using Silver Dollars (Part 5)

January 31, 2016 Dollars are US money – Congress says so. In previous articles, we’ve discussed how to incorporate them into everyday commerce, allowing you to buy (POS) and sell (Invoicing) things, pay salaries (Payroll), and handle most ordinary transactions (Bill Pay) using Silver Dollars.

We’ve seen how you can use an Account to safeguard your Silver Dollars, while allowing you to deposit more and to make withdrawals. Today, we’ll look at how you can make investments denominated in Silver Dollars.

Suppose that you wanted to buy 100 shares of IBM. You could open an account at a brokerage house, deposit sufficient funds in Paper Dollars, and then instruct them – as your agent – to buy the shares for you.

They would handle the transaction, billing your Paper Dollar account, and keep your shares in their name for you. But, if you want the purchase, and/or later sale, transacted and accounted for in Silver Dollars, they can’t help you. They just are not set up to work with Silver Dollars.

Now, Cambi is not a stock broker – just as we are not a bank. But, what we can do is order an item you desire, purchase it ourselves, and then resell it to you. We would add on a small profit, rather than the commission that a broker would charge. This is just as any merchant would do for any item that you would care to special order.

Since Cambi IS set up to work with Paper Dollars or with Silver Dollars (or even Plastic Dollars), you could pay for your investment purchase any way you like. And, when you’re ready to sell, we’ll buy it back from you at whatever the current market value is (less a small profit), denominated either in Paper Dollars or Silver Dollars.

You can buy and sell from us in Paper Dollars. You can buy and sell from us in Silver Dollars. Or you can use Paper Dollars for one leg of the transaction and Silver Dollars for the other.

As I write, IBM is quoted around $125 Paper Dollars. If you want IBM for Paper Dollars, Cambi could buy the shares, add on a percent or two for profit, and resell them to you. Suppose IBM doubles to $250, and you decide to sell the shares back to Cambi for Silver Dollars. If the Paper:Silver Dollar Exchange Rate at that time were 25 to 1, then Cambi might pay you $10 per share. Yes, nominally you would have a loss on the transaction, but that would be your choice, after you have considered the potential benefits.

Using Silver Dollars for investments would not be limited to stocks. Anything that you would like to invest in, be it Bonds, Real Estate, Art, or something else, if Cambi can purchase it or sell it, then we can buy or sell it from/to you in Paper Dollars or Silver Dollars.

If you prefer not to pick individual investments for yourself, Cambi also can act as a kind of financial adviser. We can select investments for you, which we believe would serve you well. Where it would be to your advantage, we can combine your purchasing power with other account holders for joint purchases.

So now we have come full circle. Both Paper Dollars and Silver Dollars are the official money of the United States. Cambi has developed – and continues to develop – ways for you to use the Silver Dollars for all the transactions you now expect to be available using Paper Dollars.

You decide which form gives you the most benefit – tax or otherwise – for any particular transaction. For Paper Dollar transactions, any business in the country can help you out. For now at least, if you want to conduct business in Silver Dollars, Cambi is your only choice.

In the not too distant future, I expect to offer this challenge: “If Cambi can’t show you how we can increase your company’s bottom line profit value by at least 10%, then we’ll give you $1000.” If you’d like for us to run the numbers for you, please contact me at (Yes, the Cambi web site still is on the drawing board.) 

Robert (Bob)  Shapiro is self-taught in Austrian Economics and has consulted briefly for the governments of Mexico, Greece, Portugal and Spain. He has traded Gold & Silver and their stocks since 1970. Bob Shapiro’s blog is

Man has had the ability to separate silver from lead for as far back as 4000 B.C.